Tag Archives: yeti

Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS)

Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is the unexplained death, usually during sleep, of a seemingly healthy baby less than a year old. SIDS is sometimes known as crib death because the infants often die in their cribs. Although the cause is unknown, it appears that SIDS might be associated with defects in the portion of an infant’s brain that controls breathing and arousal from sleep. Researchers have discovered some factors that might put babies at extra risk. They’ve also identified measures you can take to help protect your child from SIDS. Perhaps the most important is placing your baby on his or her back to sleep.

Symptoms and causes

Causes

A combination of physical and sleep environmental factors can make an infant more vulnerable to SIDS. These factors vary from child to child.

Physical factors

Physical factors associated with SIDS include:

  • Brain defects. Some infants are born with problems that make them more likely to die of SIDS. In many of these babies, the portion of the brain that controls breathing and arousal from sleep hasn’t matured enough to work properly.
  • Low birth weight. Premature birth or being part of a multiple birth increases the likelihood that a baby’s brain hasn’t matured completely, so he or she has less control over such automatic processes as breathing and heart rate.
  • Respiratory infection. Many infants who died of SIDS had recently had a cold, which might contribute to breathing problems.

Sleep environmental factors

The items in a baby’s crib and his or her sleeping position can combine with a baby’s physical problems to increase the risk of SIDS. Examples include:

  • Sleeping on the stomach or side. Babies placed in these positions to sleep might have more difficulty breathing than those placed on their backs.
  • Sleeping on a soft surface. Lying face down on a fluffy comforter, a soft mattress or a waterbed can block an infant’s airway.
  • Sharing a bed. While the risk of SIDS is lowered if an infant sleep in the same room as his or her parents, the risk increases if the baby sleeps in the same bed with parents, siblings or pets.
  • Being too warm while sleeping can increase a baby’s risk of SIDS.

Risk factors

Although sudden infant death syndrome can strike any infant, researchers have identified several factors that might increase a baby’s risk. They include:

  • Boys are slightly more likely to die of SIDS.
  • Infants are most vulnerable between the second and fourth months of life.
  • For reasons that aren’t well-understood, nonwhite infants are more likely to develop SIDS.
  • Family history.Babies who’ve had siblings or cousins die of SIDS are at higher risk of SIDS.
  • Secondhand smoke.Babies who live with smokers have a higher risk of SIDS.
  • Being premature.Both being born early and having a low birth weight increase your baby’s chances of SIDS.

Maternal risk factors

During pregnancy, the mother also affects her baby’s risk of SIDS, especially if she:

  • Is younger than 20
  • Smokes cigarettes
  • Uses drugs or alcohol
  • Has inadequate prenatal care
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Swimming Tips for Babies

Getting your baby used to water early in his life makes sense from a safety point of view. Swimming is also great fun and good exercise. Here’s some advice on taking the plunge with your little one.

When can I start swimming with my baby?

It’s best that you wait until six weeks after your baby’s birth before you go swimming. If you go sooner, there’s a chance you could pick up an infection. If you’ve had a caesarean section or a perineal tear, your health visitor or GP may recommend that you wait longer than six weeks, usually until after your postnatal check.

Even if you gave birth with no intervention or tears, you will experience some bleeding as your body gets rid of the lining of your womb after birth (lochia). It’s normal to bleed for anything up to six weeks after birth.

However, your baby can go swimming at any time from birth, although most baby swimming classes start at six weeks. If you are keen for your baby to be introduced to swimming before he is six weeks old, your partner or someone else can take him. Some private baby swimming classes start as early as four weeks. There’s no need to wait until your baby is immunized before taking him to a pool.

If your baby is younger than six months old only take him to a pool that’s heated to about 32 degrees C. It’s best to go to baby swimming lessons that use warm pools for young babies. Big, public pools are too cold for young babies.

What will I need to take?

Top of the list will be reusable swim nappies. Accidents can happen! You’ll also need to pack:

A warm bottle for after the swim if you are bottle-feeding.

A towel, preferably one with a hood, or a toweling dressing gown.

A snack if your baby has started solids. Swimming makes babies hungry.

A few of your baby’s bath toys to encourage a relaxed and fun atmosphere.

Changing mat and nappy bag.

How do I keep my baby safe in the water?

Make sure the pool is warm enough. If necessary, ask the pool attendants to check the temperature for you. Babies under six months need a temperature of about 32 degrees C. Make sure the water comes up to your baby’s shoulders to keep him warm, and keep him moving in the water.

As soon as your baby starts to shiver, get him out of the pool and wrap him up warmly. Babies lose heat more quickly than adults, so they shouldn’t stay in the pool for too long.

Start off with sessions of 10 minutes and build up to 20 minutes. If your baby is under a year old, limit your time in the water to 30 minutes’ maximum.

If your baby has a bad cold, a temperature or seems unwell, don’t go swimming. Also, your baby shouldn’t swim with a tummy bug and shouldn’t go swimming until he has been clear for at least 48 hours.

If your baby has a skin complaint, check with your GP to make sure that the chlorine won’t irritate him. Always rinse the chlorinated water off your baby after swimming and apply a moisturizer all over his skin, especially if he has dry skin or eczema.

I’m taking my baby to the pool on my own. Any tips?

Start by getting your baby used to the water. Make bath time fun. Gently splash water over his body or lie him on his back and move him gently through the water.

When you first visit a public pool, pick a time when it’s not too busy. Phone ahead to find out if there is pushchair access and changing tables. Ask a friend to come with you or join a mum-and-baby session. If you feel relaxed and confident, your baby will too.

There are lots of things you can do to make swimming fun for your baby and help boost his confidence in the water:

When you get in the pool, hold your baby close and keep eye contact with him.

When you feel more confident, try extending your arms and swishing your baby around.

Talk to him and praise him all the time.

Let your baby splash and play with his bath toys. Throw one a few feet across the pool and “zoom” him through the water to retrieve it.

Put your mouth under water and show your baby how to blow bubbles. This is an important lesson for him, as he can’t inhale water if he is blowing. If your baby is very young, blow a toy across the water and get him to blow it back or at least copy you blowing.

When he can sit up, put him on the side of the pool and sing “Humpty Dumpty”. When you get to the line “Humpty Dumpty had a great fall” lift him down into the water with a splash.

Lay him on his back with his head resting on your shoulder. Encourage him to kick his legs.

I’m not confident in the water, should I still take my baby swimming?

Even if you’re not keen on being in the water, you can make sure your baby gets the benefits that come from learning to swim.

You could try going for a few swims on your own in your local pool before taking your baby with you. Or you could join a baby swimming class. This will boost your confidence as much as your baby’s, and is a great way to meet other parents.

Learning to enjoy the water with your baby will strengthen the bond between the two of you as well as making you feel more positive about swimming.

What happens at baby swimming classes?

Baby swim classes are usually made up of a small group of parents and babies. The classes are usually arranged by ability. If you join a beginner’s class it will be everyone else’s first time too.

Baby swim teachers aim to make their sessions relaxed and fun, and to encourage learning through play. Young babies are born able to do primitive swimming strokes. Your teacher will build on these natural reflexes until your little one is completely happy moving in and through the water.

Once the two of you are in the pool, hold your baby in a way that allows you to keep eye contact. Give him constant praise to build his confidence. Your support and encouragement helps him to feel safe and secure.

Once your baby is confident in the pool, your teacher may encourage your baby to try swimming under water.

It’s natural for you to feel anxious the first time you and your baby try this. Rest assured babies have a natural affinity with water. Plus, your baby’s inbuilt gag reflex is generally strongest up to six months old. This reflex allows him to hold his breath under water without even thinking about it.

What do seeing babies in a dream mean?

Dreaming of babies may represent an immature aspect of yourself or a new aspect of yourself that is still maturing or developing. It may also symbolize a part of you that is feeling neglected or needs to be nurtured, loved and accepted by you.

Alternately, a baby may represent someone that is acting like a baby or someone who is naïve or innocent (possibly you).

A baby dream may also be prodromal and is telling you that you are pregnant.

Other dreams with babies

Changing a baby’s diaper or seeing a baby that needs to be changed may suggest changes that you need to implement in some aspect of life or within yourself.

Dreams about babies dying may suggest that you are maturing and letting go of your babyish thinking and behavior.

A dream about a baby drowning may suggest that your emotions are overwhelming you and you are crying like a baby – you need help to keep from drowning in your emotions.

A sleeping baby may represent peace of mind, being happy and content with no worries in life and a clear conscience.

If you are trying to get pregnant in waking life then dreaming about a babies may be a continuation of your waking life thoughts; or wish fulfillment. It may also be a rehearsal dream, preparing you for when you do become pregnant in waking life.

Having baby dreams may also be due to a fear of being or getting pregnant, especially if you’ve recently had unprotected sex and don’t want to be pregnant.

Seeing baby animals in a dream may indicate you are recognizing a basic animal instinct or behavior within you that is beginning to emerge and grow stronger. Consider your associations to the animal and its characteristics and traits for further analysis.

Meanings of the Sex of the Baby in a dream

If you are a woman, a dream about a baby girl may represent your inner child or an aspect of yourself that needs to grow up or mature. A dream about a baby boy may represent an aspect of your Animus that needs to be nurtured and encouraged to mature.

If you are a man, a dream about a baby girl may represent an aspect of your Anima that needs to be nurtured and encouraged to mature. A dream about a baby boy may represent your inner child or an aspect of yourself that needs to grow up or mature.

Truth behind Annabelle (The Haunted Doll)

According to claims originating from Ed and Lorraine Warren, a student nurse was given the Raggedy Ann doll in 1970, but after the doll behaved strangely, a psychic medium told the student the doll was inhabited by the spirit of a dead girl named “Annabelle Higgins”. Supposedly, the student nurse and her roommate first tried to accept and nurture the spirit-possessed doll, but eventually became frightened by the doll’s malicious behavior and contacted the Warrens, who removed the doll to their museum after pronouncing it “demonically possessed”.

Texas State University assistant professor of religious studies Joseph Laycock says most skeptics have dismissed the Warrens’ museum as “full of off-the-shelf Halloween junk, dolls and toys, books you could buy at any bookstore”. Laycock calls the Annabelle legend an “interesting case study in the relationship between pop culture and paranormal folklore” and speculates that the demonic doll trope popularized by films such as Child’s Play and The Conjuring likely emerged from early legends surrounding Robert the Doll as well as a Twilight Zone episode entitled “Living Doll”. Laycock suggests that “the idea of demonically-possessed dolls allows modern demonologists to find supernatural evil in the most banal and domestic of places.”

Commenting on publicity for the Warrens’ occult museum coinciding with the film release of The Conjuring, science writer Sharon A. Hill said that many of the myths and legends surrounding the Warrens have “seemingly been of their own doing” and that many people may have difficulty “separating the Warrens from their Hollywood portrayal”. Hill criticized sensational press coverage of the Warrens’ occult museum and its Annabelle doll. She said, “Like real-life Ed Warren, real-life Annabelle is actually far less impressive.” Of the supernatural claims made about Annabelle by Ed Warren, Hill said, “We have nothing but Ed’s word for this, and also for the history and origins of the objects in the museum.”

Secrets behind baby’s unusual crying

The reality is, all babies cry: It’s the best (and only) way for them to communicate their needs at this tender age. And as parents, we’re biologically programmed to respond so those needs get met. But in babies with colic, the crying starts suddenly for no apparent reason and has no apparent cure.

Colic is not a disease or diagnosis but a combination of baffling behaviors. It’s really just a catch-all term for problem crying in otherwise healthy babies the problem being, there’s no solution to it besides the passing of time. And it’s common, occurring in one in five infants. Episodes can go on for hours at a time, sometimes late into the night. Worst of all, try as you might and try you will it’s extremely difficult to calm a colicky baby, which only compounds your own frustration, worry and exhaustion.

Doctors usually diagnose colic based on the “rules of three.” Your baby’s crying:

Lasts at least three hours at a stretch
Occurs at least three days a week
Persists for at least three weeks in a row
Of course, some babies are colic overachievers, wailing for far more hours, days and even weeks at a time.

The good news is that colic doesn’t last. Most bouts peak at around 6 weeks and then typically start to taper off by 10 to 12 weeks. By 3 months (typically a little later in preterm babies), most colicky infants seems to be miraculously cured. The colic may stop suddenly or end gradually, with some good and some bad days, until they are all good.

In the meantime, a little knowledge and a lot of patience will help you survive until the storm subsides.

SYMPTOMS AND SIGNS OF COLIC IN YOUR BABY
How do you know for sure if your baby’s colicky? In addition to the rules of three, here are a few further colic signs and symptoms:

Crying occurs at the same time every day (usually in the late afternoon or early evening, but it can vary).
Crying seems to occur for no reason (not because baby has a dirty diaper or is hungry or tired).
Baby may pull up his legs, clench his fists and generally move his legs and arms more.
He also often will close his eyes or open them very wide, furrow his brow, even hold his breath briefly.
Bowel activity may increase, and he may pass gas or spit up.
Eating and sleeping are disrupted by the crying — baby frantically seeks a nipple only to reject it once sucking has begun, or dozes for a few moments only to wake up screaming.
WHAT’S THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN COLIC AND ORDINARY CRYING?
There isn’t a clear definition of exactly what colic is or how (and if) it differs from other types of crying. But doctors typically agree that the difference between colic and ordinary crying in that baby seems inconsolable, crying turns to screaming, and the ordeal lasts for at least three hours and sometimes much longer (occasionally nearly around the clock, much to the tired and fraught parents’ dismay). Most often, colicky periods recur daily, though some babies take an occasional night off.

WHAT CAUSES COLIC?
While the exact cause of colic is a mystery, experts do know it’s not the result of genetics or anything that happened during pregnancy or childbirth. Nor is it any reflection on parenting skills (or lack of them, in case you’re wondering). And it’s also not anyone’s fault.

That said, here are some theories on what’s behind colicky crying:

Overstimulated senses. One possible explanation: Newborns have a built-in mechanism for tuning out sights and sounds around them, which allows them to sleep and eat without being disturbed by their environment. Near the end of the first month, however, this mechanism disappears — leaving babies more sensitive to the stimuli in their surroundings. With so many new sensations coming at them, some infants become overwhelmed, often at the end of the day. To release that stress, they cry (and cry and cry). Colic ends, the theory goes, when baby learns how to filter out some environmental stimuli and, in doing so, avoids a sensory overload.
An immature digestive system. Digesting food is a big task for a baby’s brand new gastrointestinal system. As a result, food may pass through too quickly and not break down completely, resulting in pain from gas in the intestines.
Infant acid re-flux. Research has found that infant GERD (gastroesophageal reflux disease) is sometimes a colic trigger. Infant GERD is often the result of an underdeveloped lower esophageal sphincter, the muscle that keeps stomach acid from flowing back up into the throat and mouth, which can irritate the esophagus. Symptoms include frequent spitting up, poor eating and irritability during and after feedings. The good news is, most babies outgrow GERD by age 1 (and colic usually goes away long before then).
Food allergies or sensitivity. Some experts believe that colic is the result of an allergy to milk protein (or lactose intolerance) in formula-fed babies. More rarely, colic may be a reaction to specific foods in Mom’s diet in breastfed babies. Either way, these allergies or sensitivity can cause tummy pain that may set off colicky behavior.
Tobacco exposure. Several studies show that moms who smoke during or after pregnancy are more likely to have babies with colic; secondhand smoke may also be a culprit. Though the link exists, it’s unclear how cigarette smoke might be related to colic. The bottom line for many more significant health reasons: Don’t smoke or let anyone else smoke around your baby.

COLIC REMEDIES
In addition to frustration and exhaustion, you may experience feelings of inadequacy and guilt as you try in vain to soothe your baby. So while staying calm is easier said than done, these soothing strategies may help ease the strain until colic passes. Just give each a fair shot before you switch to another (and don’t pull out too many tricks at one time, or you’ll overload baby’s circuits and step up the crying you’re trying to stop).

If you suspect over-stimulation:
Crying is a baby’s only way of communicating her needs. But it’s also her only way of wielding any control at all over a vast and bewildering new environment: She cries, you come running to her side powerful stuff when you’re otherwise completely powerless. In fact, studies show that responding promptly to your baby’s cries will reduce her crying in the long run.
Excise excitement. Limit visitors and exposing your baby to new experiences in stimulating environments, particularly in the late afternoon and early evening. Watch how your baby responds to certain stimuli and steer clear of any that seem to offend.
Create calm. Trying to make her environment peaceful might help her relax. Dim the lights, speak or sing in soothing tones (or don’t speak at all) and keep other noise and distractions to a minimum.

Source: www.whattoexpect.com

Yeti – The Enigma of Nepal

The Yeti or Abominable Snowman (Nepali: himamanav, lit. “mountain man”) is an ape-like cryptid taller than an average human that is said to inhabit the Himalayan region of Nepal, Bhutan and Tibet. The names Yeti and Meh-Teh are commonly used by the people indigenous to the region, and are part of their history and mythology. Stories of the Yeti first emerged as a facet of Western popular culture in the 19th century.

According to H. Siiger, the Yeti was a part of the pre-Buddhist beliefs of several Himalayan people. He was told that the Lepcha people worshipped a “Glacier Being” as a God of the Hunt. He also reported that followers of the Bon religion once believed the blood of the “mir god” or “wild man” had use in certain mystical ceremonies. The being was depicted as an apelike creature who carries a large stone as a weapon and makes a whistling swoosh sound.

Sightings:

The frequency of reports increased during the early 20th century, when Westerners began making determined attempts to scale the many mountains in the area and occasionally reported seeing odd creatures or strange tracks.

In 1925, N. A. Tombazi, a photographer and member of the Royal Geographical Society, writes that he saw a creature at about 15,000 ft (4,600 m) near Zemu Glacier. Tombazi later wrote that he observed the creature from about 200 to 300 yd (180 to 270 m), for about a minute. “Unquestionably, the figure in outline was exactly like a human being, walking upright and stopping occasionally to pull at some dwarf rhododendron bushes. It showed up dark against the snow, and as far as I could make out, wore no clothes.” About two hours later, Tombazi and his companions descended the mountain and saw the creature’s prints, described as “similar in shape to those of a man, but only six to seven inches long by four inches wide. The prints were undoubtedly those of a biped.”

Western interest in the Yeti peaked dramatically in the 1950s. While attempting to scale Mount Everest in 1951, Eric Shipton took photographs of a number of large prints in the snow, at about 6,000 m (20,000 ft) above sea level. These photos have been subject to intense scrutiny and debate. Some argue they are the best evidence of Yeti’s existence, while others contend the prints are those of a mundane creature that have been distorted by the melting snow.

Peter Byrne reported finding a yeti footprint in 1948, in northern Sikkim, India near the Zemu Glacier, while on holiday from a Royal Air Force assignment in India.

In 1953, Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay reported seeing large footprints while scaling Mount Everest. Hillary would later discount Yeti reports as unreliable. In his first autobiography Tenzing said that he believed the Yeti was a large ape, and although he had never seen it himself his father had seen one twice, but in his second autobiography he said he had become much more skeptical about its existence.

On 25 July 2008, the BBC reported that hairs collected in the remote Garo Hills area of North-East India by Dipu Marak had been analyzed at Oxford Brookes University in the UK by primatologist Anna Nekaris and microscopy expert Jon Wells. These initial tests were inconclusive, and ape conservation expert Ian Redmond told the BBC that there was similarity between the cuticle pattern of these hairs and specimens collected by Edmund Hillary during Himalayan expeditions in the 1950s and donated to the Oxford University Museum of Natural History, and announced planned DNA analysis. This analysis has since revealed that the hair came from the Himalayan goral.

A group of Chinese scientists and explorers in 2010 proposed to renew searches in Shennongjia province, which was the site of expeditions in the 1970s and 1980s.

At a 2011 conference in Russia, participating scientists and enthusiasts declared having “95% evidence” of the Yeti’s existence. However, this claim was disputed later; American anthropologist and anatomist Jeffrey Meldrum, who was present during the Russian expedition, claimed the “evidence” found was simply an attempt by local officials to drum up publicity.

A yeti was reportedly captured in Russia in December 2011. Initially the story claimed that a hunter reported having seen a bear like creature, trying to kill one of his sheep, but after he fired his gun, the creature ran into a forest on 2 legs. The story then claimed that border patrol soldiers captured a hairy 2-legged female creature similar to a gorilla that ate meat and vegetation. This was later revealed as a hoax, or possibly a publicity stunt for charity.

So the question is does this strange creature still exist? Why haven’t we found any traces of its existence?  Or is it just a myth? The mystery is still undiscovered.