Shame, shame puppy shame, All the monkeys know your name!!

We all might have heard it and felt ashamed when someone teased us saying “Shame, shame, puppy shame. All the monkeys know your name?” But have you wandered about who this teasing sentence came from? Who started it? How someone came to use this to tease a child?

With reference to various blogs about it, there might be a possibility that this was originated from INDIA.

In India, one can see monkeys around backyard garden; they climb trees to pluck fruits etc. The climate is very hot and babies are left out even without a napkin till they grow a little bit older. But when they grow up, they are expected to cover their below waist portion and not reveal it even to the young ones around them, when exposed the people tease them by saying shame, shame puppy shame, just to make him cover his below waist portion. However, no one will says ‘Shame, shame Puppy shame’ when a kid wears a napkin.

Ear infection and its Remedies

Ear infection or earache in children is common amongst the age group of 0-3 years, causing babies much pain and discomfort. It has a tendency to get worse in the winter as the cold winds and the dry air start enveloping us. Being a parent, you would want to make earache go away immediately. But antibiotics may not be the best option if your baby is too little. Thankfully, there are some excellent home remedies that can help your baby feel better very quickly!

Is your little kid pulling her ear constantly? Is she not sleeping well, crying, or desires to be held more than usual? Babies find it hard to communicate and explain the exact cause of their discomfort. But these signs could indicate, especially in cold weather, a problem you need to guard against: earache. Ear pain is a common illness among kids. Symptoms may vary from child to child, but the one unifying theme is their relentless discomfort. Typically, a cold or respiratory infection is the harbinger of ear pain in your child, but there are other factors that can cause earaches in children too.

Causes of Ear Pain:

Fluid Build Up: The Eustachian tube is shorter in younger kids than compared to adults. Hence, fluid is likely to build up more in the eardrum and cause ear pain in kids.

Blocked Ear Canal: Your child’s ear canal may be injured due to poking or blockages from ear wax.

Overuse of Pacifiers: Sucking pacifiers constantly pulls fluid from nose and throat to the middle of the ear, hence causing ear pain.

Bacterial Infection: Bacteria from milk, being fed through a bottle, external factors like environmental irritants, or hereditary reasons can also cause an ear infection, leading to discomfort or pain.

Know the Symptoms:

Your child has a fever ranging from 100°F – 104°F

There’s a discharge of yellow, brown, or white fluid from your child’s ears

Your kid is cranky

He constantly pokes his ears with his fingers

Your baby shakes his head frequently

Your little bundle of joy suddenly becomes hard to deal with

Your baby has very disturbed sleep

Natural Home Remedies for Ear Pain Relief:

Onion – Whole or Juiced:

The warmth of an onion along with its antiseptic properties works well in healing earaches in children. Crush an onion and wrap it in a cloth and place on the ear. You may also grate the onion to extract its juice and heat it over low heat. Put 2-3 drops into the ears and keep it for a few minutes.

Ginger Juice:

Ginger has a natural agent that serves as an excellent painkiller. Crush the ginger to extract its juice and put it directly into the ears. This should reduce the pain and also the inflammation. Keep it for 5-10 minutes and repeat twice a day.

Juice of Neem/Basil Leaves:

Both these leaves contain anti-inflammatory, anti-fungal, and anti-bacterial properties and are considered good home remedies for ear pain in kids. Crush a few leaves to extract the juice and put a few drops into your kid’s ears. Let it stay for a while and drain out by turning the head on the other side.

Essential Oils of Mustard/Olive:

Mustard and olive oil help get rid of infection quickly, thus making this is a fast remedy for ear pain in kids. Lukewarm any of these oils and put 3-4 drops into the ears, twice a day. This should also help to stop the buzzing sound your baby suffers from.

Warm Compresses:

Place a warm cloth soaked in hot water, or a hot water bag wrapped in a towel, against the aching ear. Keep repeating this to lessen your child’s ear pain.

Hair Dryer:

Doesn’t sound familiar? But it’s a great way to provide relief from earaches in children! Set your dryer on warm and hold it a little away from the ears. The heat will dry the accumulated fluid in the ear and soothe your child’s ear pain. Do not use it for more than five minutes.

These remedies prove to be very effective in managing earache in young children. However, consult a pediatrician if the pain aggravates or if the body temperature rises. Ear pain in kids can be a distressing experience both for you and your child. It is thus important to give this condition immediate attention.

 

Source: World of moms

Myths behind Rishi Panchami

On the day of Rishi Panchami homage is paid to the 7 Rishis or sages i.e Kashyapa, Atri, Bharadhvaja, Vishvamitra, Gauthama, Jamadagni and Vashishta. Women observe the Hartalika Teej (fasting) for three days. For them, Rishi Panchami is the final day of fasting. The fast on the fifth day (Panchmi) of the waxing moon (shukl paksh) of Bhadrapad is undertaken by men and women alike. Its effect is to wash away sins done voluntarily or involuntarily. The devotee should after a bath in the sacred water, clean his/her hands 108 times, the mouth 108 times and listen to the story of Ganesh, Navagreh, Saptarishi and worship Arundhati. Fruits should be eaten only once in a day.

As the legend goes, there was a king called Sitasale who asked Brahma to advise him about a fast that can free one from all the sins of past lives. Brahma narrated him a story of Brahmana called Uttank whose daughter was widowed a few months after her marriage, was badly bitten by worms and experienced other great sufferings. Brahmanas meditated in order to discover the cause of the daughter’s sufferings. They came to know that the daughter had made offences in her previous life by entering the kitchen on the day of menstruation. After realizing this, the daughter observed the Rishi Panchami Vrat and purified herself.

The fast is strictly observed in this day. Most of the women used to eat fruit or root vegetables only, however, nowadays, they eat rice and curry after the worship is completed. This is one of the very strict and tuff fasts. Many women these days do not take the menstruation taboo seriously which is a reason for Rishi Panchami Vrat being unpopular these days. Whatever be the case, Rishi Panchami is still strictly followed in the rural and town areas of Nepal. This fast is observed by women to seek forgiveness for the mistakes committed during their menstruation period.

Gai Jatra – The Festival of Cow

Gaijatra is also known as the festival of cow. This festival is celebrated in remembrance of died people mainly in Kathmandu valley by the Newar and Tharu community. Gai Jatra has its roots in the ancient ages when people feared and worshiped Yamaraj, the god of death. However, the ironic sessions synonymous with the Gai Jatra festival entered the tradition in the medieval period of Nepal during the reign of the Malla Kings. Hence, the present form of Gaijatra is a happy blending of antiquity and the medieval era.

According to the traditions since time immemorial, every family who has lost one relative during the past year must participate in a procession through the streets of Kathmandu leading a cow. If a cow is unavailable then a young boy dressed as a cow is considered a fair substitute.

Reasons Behind Celebrating Bhoto Jatra

Rato Machhindranath is the Buddhist deity of rain and water known as the God of rain.The name Rato Machhindranath means ‘Red Fish God’. Rato as in red, Machhindra or Matsyendra means fish and Nath means god, even the statue of the deity is red in color.

The legends behind Rato Machhindranath (also known by the names of Karunamaya and Bunga Dyah) are so many that is hard for us to say which one is the real one. Maybe that’s why they are called legends. All legends are not contradicting to each other. It’s just that they are like different versions of the same story told by different people in their own set of values and beliefs. Most of the time the names and characters differ but the story is the same of a drought in the valley for which to end people seek out the help of Rato Machhindranath.

The legend states that when Guru Gorakhnath came to Patan, no one knew his true identity. When he wasn’t given any meals from the locals he found the Nags (serpents) responsible for the rain in the valley and he captured them, then he went on to mediate. While the nags were in captivity they could not make rain bringing in severe drought in the valley. So, the advisors to the King Narendra Dev then asked the King to bring Machhindranath, teacher of Gorakhnath from Assam in India in hopes to end the drought. And when Gorakhnath heard his teacher is in Patan he decided to visit him setting the serpents free. The valley then had plenty of rain, being thankful to Machhindranath the local started to worship him for saving them from drought and King Narendra Dev started the festival of Rato Machhindranath in 879 A.D.

The legend behind Bhoto Jatra comes from the story in which a farmer was gifted the bhoto in gratitude by the Karkotaka Nag (snake) for curing the eye aliment of his Queen. One day the farmer lost the bhoto when he took it off to go work in the field. Later he saw a man wearing the same vest among the crowd in the festival of Rato Machhindranath, which resulted in a quarrel between the man and the farmer. At the festival, the Karkotaka Nag was also present in human form. He then proceeded to settle the dispute between them and offered the vest to Rato Machhindranath saying whoever brings the proof of ownership of the bhoto shall have it, till then it will remain in the custody of the deity.So every year, on the last day of Rato Machhindranath Jatra, the bhoto is shown to the public in presence of Patan’s Kumari (living goddess) and the president, the head of state (previously it used to be the King before abolition of monarch system in Nepal) in hope that the owner will come forward with the evidence to claim it.

After Bhota Jatra, the statue of the deity is transferred to the shikhar-style temple in Bungamati where it will stay for six months before the jatra next year. The chariot is then taken apart. Once in every 12 years, the festival of Rato Machhindranath starts and ends in Bungamati, a small Newar village, believed to be the birth place of Machhindranath, 6 km to the south of Patan.

Bhoto Jatra, another separate ritual and an addition to festival which has now become a part of Rato Machhindranath Jatra marks the end to this month long lively festivities. On the fourth day after the chariot reachesJawalakhel, Bhota Jatra is held.

The legend behind Bhoto Jatra comes from the story in which a farmer was gifted the bhoto in gratitude by the Karkotaka Nag (snake) for curing the eye aliment of his Queen. One day the farmer lost the bhoto when he took it off to go work in the field. Later he saw a man wearing the same vest among the crowd in the festival of Rato Machhindranath, which resulted in a quarrel between the man and the farmer. At the festival, the Karkotaka Nag was also present in human form. He then proceeded to settle the dispute between them and offered the vest to Rato Machhindranath saying whoever brings the proof of ownership of the bhoto shall have it, till then it will remain in the custody of the deity.So every year, on the last day of Rato Machhindranath Jatra, the bhoto is shown to the public in presence of Patan’s Kumari (living goddess) and the president, the head of state (previously it used to be the King before abolition of monarch system in Nepal) in hope that the owner will come forward with the evidence to claim it.

After Bhota Jatra, the statue of the deity is transferred to the shikhar-style temple in Bungamati where it will stay for six months before the jatra next year. The chariot is then taken apart. Once in every 12 years, the festival of Rato Machhindranath starts and ends in Bungamati, a small Newar village, believed to be the birth place of Machhindranath, 6 km to the south of Patan.

Warning: You Will Suddenly Want Your Kids to Color on the Walls After Reading This Sweet Story

On a damp, dreary, stay-in-the-house kind of day, I was a 4-year-old artist armed with a new treasure: my own big box of crayons. Somehow, the usual paper borrowed from Mom’s typewriter wasn’t special enough for these 64 perfect, waxy, sweet-smelling sticks of vivid color. I looked around for a bigger canvas. The walls presented an inviting yet forbidden landscape. If only there were hidden walls, walls that people could sometimes see and sometimes not. Walls like the ones in Mom and Dad’s closet.

Slipping quietly down the hall to the bedroom, I stood on tiptoe to reach the string for the closet light. Using my whole body, I pushed aside the heavy clothes and shut the door behind me. Words and images filled my mind faster than my hands could make them. Bright reds, sky blues, greens, purples, bright explosive yellows and oranges, fuchsia and lime — all became pictures, numbers and letters.

A brilliant rainbow arched across one wall, with a cheery golden sun peeking out from above. Below, a giant shade tree supported a rope and tire swing for stick-figure children. Around them, flowers bloomed everywhere. Then I drew my reddish-brown cat with its slanted green eyes and long black whiskers.

My masterpiece! All my very own magic! I took in the walls, the colors, the brightness, and joy swelled inside me. But as my creativity wound down, a thought popped up: I’ve got to show Mom! Suddenly I was still. I looked around with new eyes. What had I done?

Mom called out, “Dinner’s ready.” After a short time, her footsteps approached, and then finally, the closet door opened. I stood nervously in the corner, still clutching the canary yellow crayon in a sweaty fist. Oh, please don’t be mad, I thought. Please, please.

Mom inhaled sharply, then stood frozen. Only her eyes moved as she slowly looked over my masterpiece. She was quiet for a long, long time. I didn’t dare breathe.

Finally, she turned to me.

“I like it,” she said. “No, I love it! It’s you! It’s happy! I feel like I have a new closet!”

Forty-five years later, my childhood artwork is still there. And in my own house, the closet walls are masterpieces, too, created by my own daughters when they were little girls.

Every time I open a closet door, I remember that, as big as that box of crayons and white walls seemed when I was little, my mother’s love was the biggest thing of all.

Story by Betty Smith

Source: Reader’s Digest

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Eating Avocados During Pregnancy – Study Finds Huge Benefits

Avocados are full of good fats, high in dietary fibre and a great source of folate. Folate is especially important during early pregnancy, because it can reduce the risk of birth defects.

According to the study: “Avocados are unique among fruits and vegetables in that, by weight, they contain much higher amounts of the key nutrients folate and potassium, which are normally under-consumed in maternal diets. “Avocados also contain higher amounts of several non-essential compounds, such as fiber, mono-unsaturated fats, and lipid-soluble antioxidants, which have all been linked to improvements in maternal health, birth outcomes and/or breast milk quality“. Currently, US dietary advice applies only to those aged two years and above. However, it is known that maternal diet during pregnancy and breastfeeding can have a huge impact on the health of both mother and baby

How Many Avocados Should I Eat Per Day?

Reproductive specialist and nutritionist Doctor Andrew Orr says, “You actually can’t eat too many of them! They are full of good fats (omega oils), protein, enzymes, amino acids, vitamins and more. They’re great as a meal on their own, in green smoothies, desserts, dips… I love using them for breakfast!” He adds, “On a traditional Chinese medicine level, avocado is nourishing to both the womb and the baby. Avocado should definitely be eaten during pregnancy – and it’s a great food for fertility too“.

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